Suitable for Patio
and Containers

Sometimes you want to grow tomatoes or other vegetables but don’t have any usuable real estate. Then it’s time to turn to large pots. All tomatoes can be grown in a container. You will get more yield in a large container than a small one. I have put this collection together of tomatoes that have a smaller growth habit and are ideal for large containers. I hope you see a theme…the word “large" prefaces container. Even though they are shallow rooted. tomatoes like room to spread. They are also fairly early.

Several benefits of a larger container are: more soil means less watering, less fertilizing and more tomatoes. 

Bush Beefsteak was a real winner for us one year. It had the biggest tomatoes I’d ever seen and a lot of them on a small plant. Patio is another good plant that had nice sized tomatoes, perfect for a balcony or patio grouping. the cherry tomatoes; Hundreds and Thousands and Tumbler are also great for snacking from a pot.

This year I am adding Dwarf (Tree Type) tomatoes from The Dwarf Tomato Project. I grew 6 of them in 2016 and was very impressed with most of them. They are perfect for a small space gardener who wants a slicer instead of the smaller tomatoes that are usually produced by most determinate tomatoes. This class of tomatoes exhibits characteristics of both determinate and indeterminate types. Historically called “tree-type,” they are now commonly referred to as dwarfs. Tree-type tomato plants have very thick main stems with minimal branching. Their foliage can be either regular or potato leaf but in either case, are rugose (e.g. dark green in color and crinkly in texture). Due to their slow growth rate, they appear from a distance to be determinate achieving three to four feet in height. However, like indeterminate, they continue to set fruit throughout the growing season. Compact and everbearing, what a great combination!

I bought my seeds for these Dwarfs from Tatianas Tomatobase. (And borrowed some pics for those I haven’t grown yet.)




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